Tag Archives: Negligent Misrepresentation

DC-10 Entertainment, n/k/a LLMJ, v. Manor Insurance Agency, 2013COA14 (February 14, 2013)

Owning a nightclub is so full of drama there is a reality TV show about it. This case starts with a bar fight, but ends with a lawsuit against an insurance broker. A Bar’s Patron is injured during a fight and sues. Bar’s insurance policy had an assault and battery exclusion and denied coverage. Bar didn’t think its policy had the exclusion, so Bar sued Broker. Bar settles with Patron and executes a “Bashor” agreement, assigning any proceeds from Bar’s claims. But the claims against Broker are dismissed because of the assignment. The court of appeals held: 1) Broker must show the settlement was unreasonable, 2) Bar could still claim assigned damages, 3) Broker’s failure to obtain the insurance requested gave rise to a negligence claim, and 4) that claim was assignable because it was a commercial, not personal transaction. Summary Judgment for Broker reversed and the case was reinstated.

http://www.courts.state.co.us/Courts/Court_Of_Appeals/Opinion/2012/11CA2637-PD.pdf

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Filed under Insurance, Personal Injury, Torts

Colorado Pool Systems, Inc. and Patrick Kitowski v. Scottsdale Insurance Company and Don Hansen, 2012COA178 (October 25, 2012)

“It’s not my fault—it was an accident!” In this case, a swimming pool had to be rebuilt. An adjuster told the insured the work would be covered, but the insurer later denied coverage under a general commercial liability insurance policy. Construing the policy, the court held: 1) “accident” is an ambiguous term that means any damage not intended; 2) an “occurrence” is damage to non-defective work, but not to defective work, because defective work is required to be repaired; and 3) the Construction Professional Commercial Liability Insurance Act is retroactive, but unconstitutional as applied. The insured also brought a negligent misrepresentation claim. The court held that because “accident” was ambiguous in the policy, the claim was actionable. It was also reasonable for the insured to rely upon the adjuster’s statements as if they were fact. Summary Judgment was reversed.

http://www.courts.state.co.us/Courts/Court_Of_Appeals/Opinion/2012/10CA2638-PD.pdf

http://www.cobar.org/opinions/opinion.cfm?opinionid=8710&courtid=1

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Filed under Constitutional, Contracts, Insurance, Torts