Tag Archives: Real Estate Broker

CapitalValue Advisors, LLC v. K2D, Inc., d/b/a Colorado Premium Foods; Kevin LaFleur; Don Babcock; and Triton Capital Partners, Ltd., 2013 COA 125 (August 15, 2013)

It is the promise, not the paper it’s written on, that makes a contract. Plaintiff is a capital advisory firm. It had an agreement with Defendants to help them find financing. Defendants later contracted with another firm that did secure financing for Defendants. Plaintiff sought to enforce a provision that entitled it to 4.5% of the financed amount. Defendants argued the agreement was void because two of three provisions violated CRS 12-61- 101 (brokerage laws) and CRS 11-51-604 (securities laws), and thus the whole agreement was void. The trial court agreed; the court of appeals did not. Looking to the number of promises in the agreement, the court held that, in essence, each provision was its own “contract” even though they were all memorialized in the same agreement. The two unlawful provisions were severed so the agreement was not void, and judgment for Defendants was reversed.

http://www.courts.state.co.us/Courts/Court_of_Appeals/Opinion/2013/12CA1396-PD.pdf

http://www.cobar.org/opinions/opinion.cfm?opinionid=9062&courtid=1

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Filed under Contracts, Corporations

Lynda S. Gibbons, Brent Wilson, and Gibbons-White, Inc., v. Gregory T. Ludlow, S. Reid Ludlow, and Jean E. Cowles, 2013CO49 (July 1, 2013)

“He who lives by the crystal ball soon learns to eat ground glass.” – Edgar R. Fiedler. In this case, the Court held that recovering damages for the bad advice of a transactional real estate broker requires proof of what would have happened but-for the bad advice. Analogizing to legal malpractice claims, the Court noted that a plaintiff must show either that he: 1) would have been able to obtain a “better deal” or 2) would have been better off with “no deal.” Both require proof that the professional’s negligent acts or omissions caused the client damages. Here, Plaintiff claimed lost profits as damages, requiring proof of either the amount of the profits that would have been earned or the fact that profits would have been earned. Plaintiff had an appraisal. The appraisal wasn’t proof a future sale of the property would have been better or different than the actual sale. Dismissal affirmed.

http://www.courts.state.co.us/userfiles/file/Court_Probation/Supreme_Court/Opinions/2011/11SC899.pdf

http://www.cobar.org/opinions/opinion.cfm?opinionid=9011&courtid=2

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Filed under Evidence, Property, Torts